The yoga, an art with different faces and benefits

Let’s bend, so we don’t break physically and mentally

Yoga is not necessarily standing upside down, or twisting our body in weird positions; it is neither for reducing belly fat or ceasing away some pain in the body. The word “yoga” means union, bringing harmony between mind and body. Yoga joins physical activities, meditation and breathing exercises to gather the body and the mind. Yoga is also commonly understood as a therapy or exercise system for health and fitness. While physical and mental health is the natural consequences of yoga, the goal of yoga is more far-reaching. At SITA, we don’t just practice yoga, we experience yoga.

Hatha Yoga: Balancing the Sun and the Moon

Talking about Sun and Moon, we don’t fancy say that we are going to make you experience some celestial journey through yoga. The word “ha” means sun, “ta” means moon. “Hatha” means the yoga to bring balance between the sun and the moon in you. Fundamentally, Hatha yoga is a physical preparation – preparing the body for a higher energy.

Asanas

We all love to lie in a comfortable position and sleep. If you are angry, you will sit one way; if you are happy, you sit another way. Similarly, eating in cross legs helps in better digestion than standing and eating. That is basically yoga asanas are about. Asanas are holding our body in particular position of balance which has certain effect on a part of the body or the whole of it. Basically, all asanas are physical postures, but not all postures are asanas, no offence to people believing yoga is a fitness workout…

Sivananda Yoga: relax and practice positive thinking

Sivananda yoga (name of its inventor) was created in India in the 1960’s. Nowadays, this discipline is known everywhere around the world. This practice is based on 5 fundamental principles. The postures or asanas help the body to be flexible, help for a better circulation of the blood and stimulate certain parts of the body often left aside. Breathing exercises, meditation and a healthy diet are also very important in this discipline because they complete the postures.

The combination of meditation and physical exercise is essential for this discipline but there is one more fundamental principle: the positive thinking. Through the regular practice of Sivananda yoga, you will incorporate serenity and calm in your daily life. It will also help you to keep your problems in perspective. In other words, this yoga is beneficial for the body and for the brain in the same time!

At SITA, yoga is for everyone!

At SITA, we propose morning and evening sessions to practice during sunrise and sunset. The classes will start with soft postures, then sun salutations, a set of 12 postures with multiple benefits. Depending on the level of each participant, the asanas will be adapted. Physical exercises are only a part of Hatha yoga and Savananda yoga. During yoga classes, you will also learn relaxation and breathing exercises in order to complete this relaxing experience.

With Ruchi and Sumesh, our yoga teachers, if you cannot do certain postures or keep it during a long time, don’t worry! They will adapt the postures to your level. It is the same for people used to do yoga. Our goal is that every participant does yoga at their own pace and find the correct placement adapted for its own body. We don’t propose a fitness class, there is no competition and everyone respects its own body. Pretty cool and comforting, right?

Practical information about yoga classes

The yoga classes last 1 hour 30 minutes and take place in the morning and evening depending on the discipline and the availability of the teachers. . For more information, do not hesitate to refer to our online schedule.

Classes are in Tamil or English. Yoga mats are available at SITA but you can bring your own mat if you wish. If it’s possible, try to wear a flexible and comfortable outfit. The classes are adapted for all levels and are intended for adults and children over 12 years old.


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